Five Tips To Great Studying While You Work

by Melania Battiston, Head Sommelier, Medlar

We all know how hard it is for hospitality professionals to find time outside of work to concentrate on their studies.

With the long hours, stress and pressure we face every day, it can be a real challenge to balance the two.

But during my time as a Sommelier I have developed – and fine-tuned – a few tricks to allow myself more time to include studies in my daily routine effectively. They could help you too if you’re studying for exams, competitions, or just want to learn more.

1 PLAN AHEAD – AND MAKE YOUR GOALS ACHIEVABLE

I always suggest to have your own agenda that guides you thorough the week. Every Sunday write down your study goals for the week to come. It doesn’t matter how many there are, you just have to make sure that they are achievable. So don’t be afraid to start small.

She’s making a list, checkin’ it twice

Then every night write a ‘to-do’ list for the day after. Divide your tasks into chunks of time and stick to them.

Why do this before going to bed? So your brain can process your easiest decisions (like what to have for breakfast or managing your schedule) during the night. This means you’re not expending useless willpower first thing in the morning when your brain is at its sharpest and should be concentrating on the most important decisions.

You want to make sure that studying doesn’t affect your real work; therefore the most practical tip here is to decide which days you’ll totally be focusing on your job and the days you will be adding studies as an extra. Try to recognise the time of the day where you’re at your most productive and then plan your study hours around that.

2 AVOID PROCRASTINATION

Ok, now that you have created your own weekly/daily schedule it’s time for some action! You’ll probably be studying only for a few hours a day; therefore you’ll need to act efficiently. Let’s get rid of the triggers that can distract you (phone, TV), have scheduled 5 minutes breaks every 25 minutes of work; and get yourself a reward every time you finish the session. It could be something as simple as “If I conclude this topic before going to work I’ll then have my favourite croissant at the coffee shop”. Again, structure is essential.

3 BUILD A COMMUNITY

It’s crucial to build up a community of like-minded people who can understand your journey, your difficulties and can cheer you on and encourage you to keep moving toward your goals and not to give up. Studying during a full-time job is hard, so you’ll need good support! Share experiences, learn from others and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

4 HAVE A REST DAY

Use your day off as a real day off. You’ve earned it and you need it. So spend it wisely by relaxing, nourishing your mind and your body. Exercise, meditation, listening to music and socialising are all good. But it’s good to try self-affirmation, too: saying positive things to yourself in front of a mirror for 5-10 minutes.

Not tasting – but necessary all the same

Things not to do on your day off: stay up late, watch screens all day, check work emails or jump onto social media as soon as you wake up.
You don’t need to feel guilty about having down-time, since your brain will work anyway in the background without you even realising it. It’s called diffuse mode and allows your brain to solve problems or make connections without you even trying.

5 KEEP YOURSELF MOTIVATED

There will be times when you feel tired, down and even demotivated. So keep reminding yourself why you are studying for this exam/competition/qualification. Visualise yourself achieving your goals and look back at all you have accomplished.

Imagine scenarios where you are succeeding (like acing a job interview or winning a competition), and be as detailed as possible – try to recreate the exact scenario in your mind, with sounds, smells and colours. Think big!

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