Gosset cellar

How to win the Gosset Matchmakers competition!

We asked the experts for five killer facts to help you create a winning food-match

Entries are now open for this year’s Gosset Matchmakers – the competition where young somms team up with young chefs to create an inspirational food pairing with these top-class champagnes.

If you were thinking of entering, or encouraging one of your colleagues to enter (and you totally should because it’s a lot of fun with great prizes), we thought you might like a few expert tips to get you started.

So we asked cellarmaster, Odilon de Varine, and head of marketing, Thibaut de Mailloux, for the essential facts that prospective candidates needed to know about Gosset and its wines – and how this might affect how you go about matching them with food.

Odilon de Varine; Pic: Franck Kauff

1. Gosset is the oldest wine house in champagne

Gosset was founded in 1584 – so for the first 150 years of its existence champagne didn’t even exist! But that long winemaking heritage is still part of the house’s thinking today.

‘We always speak about making wines first, and then champagne,’ says Thibaut. ‘The bubbles are just there to enhance the wine.’

Throughout our conversation, the word ‘vinous’ comes up again and again. It’s a useful key-word to bear in mind when you start to drill down into what’s in the glass.

Vinosity and a bright acidity are hallmarks of the Gosset style

2. There is no malolactic fermentation in any of Gosset’s wines

Acidity is a key part of the character of any champagne. Many houses allow their wines to go through malolactic fermentation – when appley malic acid converts to softer lactic acid.  But not Gosset*.

‘The way we try to explain it is that our winemaking approach preserves all the natural freshness and aromas of the grape,’ says Thibaut. ‘Lactic acid is not part of the grapes when you harvest the fruit. So we block it for all the wines.’

Odilon also points out that, with climate change, there is probably the same amount of acidity in a non-malo wine now as there would have been in a malo wine 30 years ago!

3. The wines spend a long time on lees

Gosset’s wines spend much longer ageing in bottle than the stipulated minimum for the appellation. In fact, they spend six months on lees even before they are bottled! This extended contact with the dead yeast cells gives a creamy richness, rather than an overt ‘bready’ character, that wraps around the bright wire of the wine’s non-malo acidity.

‘It’s always about balance,’ says Odilon. ‘Balancing acidity, body and roundness.’

Extended time in bottle is crucial to Gosset’s complexity. Photo: Leif Carlsson

4. There’s a lot of subtlety in the wines

It’s important to distinguish between power and weight. ‘We believe our wines are powerful in terms of aroma, which doesn’t mean they are heavy,’ says Thibaut. ‘The acidity opens up the palate to be able to appreciate the extreme complexity.’

Odilon, meanwhile, focuses on the nature of the perlage.

‘For us the bubbles are just there to allow the wine to express itself,’ he says. ‘We have very fine, delicate bubbles. We want the wine to be there before the bubbles.

‘The palate-cleansing aspect of our champagne is very important,’ he goes on. ‘It prepares the palate for more flavours. That’s why we work a lot with salinity – and a small bitterness that helps to clean the palate.’

Again, the term ‘vinosity’ seems appropriate.

5. Explore the balance between red and white grapes

Gosset’s Grande Réserve brut is typically evenly split between Pinot Noir and Chardonnay (about 45% each) with 10% of Pinot Meunier. But it changes every year. ‘A recipe is the exact opposite of winemaking,’ says Odilon. ‘The grape varieties are tools [to create a consistent style].’

Nonetheless, Odilon and Thibaut point out that the more or less equal balance of red and white grapes can make for some interesting opportunities when it comes to matching, allowing you to pull out elements of freshness, aroma or florality from the Chardonnay, or richer more red-fruit elements from the Pinots.

Competitors to this year’s competition must come up with a food match for the Grande Réserve brut

A few highlights from last year’s winners

Last year’s winning dish from the team at Fischer’s, Baslow Hall in Derbyshire
Adam Eyre (chef) and Matthew Davison (somm) presenting their creation to the judges
And then later on finding out that they’ve won!

We hope you find this introduction to Gosset’s wines, history and style useful and that it inspires you to AMAZING food-matching suggestions. Don’t forget, you need to apply for your entry pack by June 23rd, and upload your entry (photo or video) by June 30th. So don’t delay! Apply today and get entering! More info here. And click here if you want to read the full story of last year’s final.

* Gosset’s Extra Brut (in the standard Champagne bottle) is the exception to the ‘no-malo’ style.

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