Grande Millesime

Latest Gosset Grand Millésime hits the UK

If you’ve run out of your 2012 stock of Gosset Grand Millésime then we have good news for you because the 2015 has just landed.

Importers Louis Latour have told the Sommelier Collective that the new vintage arrived this week, slightly earlier than expected.

It’s great news for fans of the oldest wine-producing house in Champagne, who often have to wait many years for vintages to land. Typically only two or three Grand Millésime wines are released every decade, with 2015 following 2012, 2006 and 2004 of recent launches.

Like all of the Gosset wines (bar one ultra brut) the wine sees no malolactic, giving it a characteristically bright line of acidity that helps with the wine’s longevity. With four and a half years in bottle, it receives extended ageing before release. Using fruit from some of the most highly-rated villages in Champagne – including Verzy, Ambonnay, Avize and Trépail, it’s a wine that is drinking well now, but also has many years ahead of it.

We asked Cellar Master, Odilon de Varine, for his take on the latest vintage.

What are the similarities – and differences between Grande Réserve and Grand Millésime?

They share the same Gosset champagne style of extreme freshness balanced with an extra-long maturation on the lees, giving complexity, depth, richness and length to the aroma. However, while Grande Réserve offers a constant year-on-year style, Grand Millésime expresses the uniqueness of the harvest.

It is a memory – a ‘souvenir cuvée’ expressed through the Gosset style.

Odilon de Varine

How does the 2015 Grand Millésime differ from 2012?

At Gosset there is no recipe to compose the blend of every cuvée – and that’s even more true when it comes to vintages, which express the tone of the grapes of the year. So a cuvée can be radically different to the previous one. While our 2012 was a Chardonnay-dominant blend (67%), our 2015 includes 59% of Pinot Noir.

Why the big change?

2015 was a relatively warm year in Champagne, and Chardonnay was quite ripe. So we selected Pinot Noir from particularly fresh terroirs this year. Tasting blind – as we always do – we found the balance we were looking for. It’s an interesting style of Pinot Noir. Aromatic, but fine and fresh.

Have vintage characters altered due to climate change?

Fruit can reach a higher level of maturity more often, and the level of acidity is slightly lower. But the evolution of growing practices (cover crops, ploughing, no fertilisers) is impacting the style of musts and wines in a sensible manner. The replacement of old vines is an issue too. The proportion of musts from younger vines is declining – and we need young vines to keep freshness and liveliness of the musts at their top level.

What food matches do you suggest for the Grand Millésime 2015?

It’s the perfect partner for fruity and spicy dishes, such as chicken in lemongrass, a lamb tagine with lemon and almonds, roasted gambas with pilau rice or griddled vegetables. The wine is both very fresh and very fruity, so it will cut through spices and exotic flavours, but also match any fruity dish, whether it’s sweet or not.

The Gosset Grand Millésime 2015 is available for £46.63 ex VAT from Louis Latour.

Collective members who want to engage more with Gosset should enter the Gosset Matchmakers competition. Open to chef/sommelier teams with less than five years’ experience each, it’s a great chance to show off your creative skills when it comes to food and wine pairings. Plus the winners get a three-day trip to Champagne for a blending masterclass with Odilon himself. So what are you waiting for? Click here for more information, and here to enter.

Odilon and deputy cellar master, Gabrielle Malagou check their handiwork

Published by